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Ivo Bisignano’s ‘Human Forms’ – referencing the dual nature of human beings

Bisignano’s ‘Human Forms’ sculptures. The dichotomy created by Bisignano dares the viewer to witness forms within the context of a space becoming a ‘museum’

Outside of Jerusalem, at the Guvrin-Maresha National Park, Italian contemporary artist Ivo Bisignano will serve his ‘Human Forms’ exhibition, based around visual hand-drawn animations and namesake wooden sculptures from August 8, 2020.

The collection comprises seven sculptures and five video-art projections creating a tension between ancient and digital, the inanimate and the human. Each of the ‘human forms’ emphazises individuality and personality and will be erected throughout the southern cave, forming a juxtaposition with its curvy interiors once created by human hands as a prehistoric form of art. His video artworks feature hand-drawings of black and white crows, lyrical texts, and pop references, composing a division between light and shadow across the limestone cave.

IVO BISIGNANO’S EXHIBITION “HUMAN FORMS”
IVO BISIGNANO’S EXHIBITION “HUMAN FORMS”
IVO BISIGNANO’S EXHIBITION “HUMAN FORMS”

‘Human Forms’ arisen from the notion to give Bisignano’s wooden sculptures a house in an archaic context and within a location that creates a symbiosis between the elements. Inspired by the womb of Mother Earth, the works reference the dual nature of human beings — the earthly body and the divine soul – with beauty, tears, racial diversity as the key pillars of inspiration.

«These forms are as old as thoughts, and as imposing as wind or rain», says Bisignano. The balanced dichotomy challenges the viewer to observe the forms within the context of a space becoming. «I wanted to install Human Forms in the incredible Southern Cave at Beit Guvrin to establish a temporary home for the work, but within a historical and archeological context within a historical and archaic context», explains Bisignano. «In this case, the ‘museum’ is the site itself».

Artist Ivo Bisignano is known for his often surrealistic work comprising a sense of nostalgia, applied to characters both real and imaginary, and linked to references from world literature and cinema – His work «contrasts the moving and still, the permanent and temporary, the alive and inanimate, into a world that is a language on its own». 

An archeological site formed by the hands of man dating as far back as the First Temple Period (112 BCE), the Southern Cave is the setting for Bisignano’s project ‘Human Forms’ – The shapes and grooves in the cave once created by human hands as a prehistoric form of art. 

The exhibition will be open to the public on August 8, 2020, and run through November 1st, 2020.

IVO BISIGNANO’S EXHIBITION “HUMAN FORMS”
IVO BISIGNANO’S EXHIBITION “HUMAN FORMS”

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